nprbooks:

The National Book Awards’ fiction longlist includes Richard Powers, who won the award in 2006; Mountain Goats vocalist John Darnielle, who was on Fresh Air yesterday; and Molly Antopol and Phil Klay, who were both nominated for their debut story collections. Although a few of the nominees were expected — Anthony Doerr’s novel All the Light We Cannot See is one of the year’s breakaway hits, and Marilynne Robinson is a living legend — the list as a whole is varied and features a handful of underappreciated or relatively new writers.

The shortlist will be announced Oct. 15, and the winners on Nov. 19. The full longlist is here.

ackb:

workingamerica:

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka spoke in Missouri today about the unfolding events in #Ferguson.
Full speech here—it’s a must read: http://bit.ly/1qX7cKq http://ift.tt/1y7Qizg

The test of our movement’s commitment to our legacy is not whether we post Dr. King’s picture in our union halls, it is do we take up his fight when the going gets tough, when the fight gets real against the evils that still exist today.
When a new immigrant gets mistreated by management because they don’t speak the language, that is our fight. 
When an African American worker doesn’t get a promotion or fair pay because of the color of his or her skin, that is our fight. When women are paid less than men for the same work, that is a fight for every single one of us. 
We cannot afford to have “my issues” and “your issue,” we must ALL stand together and mobilize around our issues.
You see, we have a choice: We can either live our history or we can change it.

ackb:

workingamerica:

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka spoke in Missouri today about the unfolding events in #Ferguson.

Full speech here—it’s a must read: http://bit.ly/1qX7cKq http://ift.tt/1y7Qizg

The test of our movement’s commitment to our legacy is not whether we post Dr. King’s picture in our union halls, it is do we take up his fight when the going gets tough, when the fight gets real against the evils that still exist today.

When a new immigrant gets mistreated by management because they don’t speak the language, that is our fight. 

When an African American worker doesn’t get a promotion or fair pay because of the color of his or her skin, that is our fight. When women are paid less than men for the same work, that is a fight for every single one of us. 

We cannot afford to have “my issues” and “your issue,” we must ALL stand together and mobilize around our issues.

You see, we have a choice: We can either live our history or we can change it.

The biggest thing I’ve taken away from this project is something I’ll never be able to prove, but I’m convinced to my core: The lack of such a database is intentional. No government—not the federal government, and not the thousands of municipalities that give their police forces license to use deadly force—wants you to know how many people it kills and why.

It’s the only conclusion that can be drawn from the evidence. What evidence? In attempting to collect this information, I was lied to and delayed by the FBI, even when I was only trying to find out the addresses of police departments to make public records requests. The government collects millions of bits of data annually about law enforcement in its Uniform Crime Report, but it doesn’t collect information about the most consequential act a law enforcer can do.

I’ve been lied to and delayed by state, county and local law enforcement agencies—almost every time. They’ve blatantly broken public records laws, and then thumbed their authoritarian noses at the temerity of a citizen asking for information that might embarrass the agency. And these are the people in charge of enforcing the law.

If you ever have trouble falling asleep just put this video of Bent snoring on repeat. You will fall into the deepest sleep ever.