“The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.”

World Bank wants water privatized, despite risks | Al Jazeera America

The World Bank is one of the most evil organizations I’ve ever come across.

My study buddy passed out on me.

My study buddy passed out on me.

Life Is Impermanent

The world constantly offers up reminders of our impermanence. Everything, including people, change. The seasons roll into one another. Spring brings us life, summer brings us revitilization, fall brings us a slow decay, winter brings death. Nothing is ever the same because we are always in a process of transition. Families grow and shrink.

Our bodies remind us that we’re not mortal. I wake up…

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theatlantic:

Our Cubicles, Ourselves: How the Modern Office Shapes American Life

Each year, the average American spends nearly 2,000 hours working. For many, that time passes inside the three little walls of a modern cubicle.
Writer Nikil Saval explores these odd spaces—how they came to be, how they make us feel—in his new book Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace. I spoke to Saval about the modern office, and a lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.
Read more. [Image: Jordan Richmond/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Our Cubicles, Ourselves: How the Modern Office Shapes American Life

Each year, the average American spends nearly 2,000 hours working. For many, that time passes inside the three little walls of a modern cubicle.

Writer Nikil Saval explores these odd spaces—how they came to be, how they make us feel—in his new book Cubed: A Secret History of the Workplace. I spoke to Saval about the modern office, and a lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.

Read more. [Image: Jordan Richmond/Flickr]

theatlantic:

Behind the Machine’s Back: How Social Media User Avoid Getting Turned Into Big Data

Social media companies constantly collect data on their users because that’s how they provide customized experiences and target their advertisements. All Twitter and Facebook users know this, and there is a broad array of feelings about how good or bad the persistent tracking of their social relationships is. 

What we do know, though, is that—when they want to—they are aware of how to go behind the machine’s back. They know how to communicate with just the humans without tipping their intentions to the algorithm. 

In a new paper, University of North Carolina sociologist Zeynep Tufekci explores some of these strategies among Turkish protesters. She looks at these behaviors as analytical challenges for researchers who are trying to figure out what’s going on. “Social media users engage in practices that alter their visibility to machine algorithms, including subtweeting, discussing a person’s tweets via ‘screen captures,’ and hate-linking,” Tufekci writes. “All these practices can blind big data analyses to this mode of activity and engagement.”
The same practices, though, from the user perspective, can be understood as strategies for communicating without being computed. All they require to execute is thinking like an algorithm.
Read more. [Image: Renee Magritte via Wikimedia Commons/The Atlantic]

theatlantic:

Behind the Machine’s Back: How Social Media User Avoid Getting Turned Into Big Data

Social media companies constantly collect data on their users because that’s how they provide customized experiences and target their advertisements. All Twitter and Facebook users know this, and there is a broad array of feelings about how good or bad the persistent tracking of their social relationships is. 

What we do know, though, is that—when they want to—they are aware of how to go behind the machine’s back. They know how to communicate with just the humans without tipping their intentions to the algorithm. 

In a new paper, University of North Carolina sociologist Zeynep Tufekci explores some of these strategies among Turkish protesters. She looks at these behaviors as analytical challenges for researchers who are trying to figure out what’s going on. “Social media users engage in practices that alter their visibility to machine algorithms, including subtweeting, discussing a person’s tweets via ‘screen captures,’ and hate-linking,” Tufekci writes. “All these practices can blind big data analyses to this mode of activity and engagement.”

The same practices, though, from the user perspective, can be understood as strategies for communicating without being computed. All they require to execute is thinking like an algorithm.

Read more. [Image: Renee Magritte via Wikimedia Commons/The Atlantic]

Pouring one out for my grandpa. RIP.

Pouring one out for my grandpa. RIP.