“The government is too afraid to say it, but the internet is a utility. The data that flows to your home is just like water and electricity: it’s not a luxury or an option in 2014. The FCC’s original Open Internet rules failed precisely because it was too timid to say that out loud, and instead erected rules on a sketchy legal sinkhole that was destined to fail. As the WSJ reports, the FCC has once again decided against reclassifying broadband as a public utility. To declare the internet a public utility would go against the wishes of companies like Comcast and AT&T, which don’t want to be dumb pipes. It’s more lucrative to be cunning.”

peterwknox:

Got our tickets (best Red Bull Season Ticket Holder perk yet) for this (well the actual game on June 1st). Can’t wait to send off #USMNT in style.

Whaaaat? Okay, well, shit. I need to buy tickets for this. My soon to be Turkish wife and I can have a friendly rivalry for a day.

peterwknox:

Got our tickets (best Red Bull Season Ticket Holder perk yet) for this (well the actual game on June 1st). Can’t wait to send off #USMNT in style.

Whaaaat? Okay, well, shit. I need to buy tickets for this. My soon to be Turkish wife and I can have a friendly rivalry for a day.

“For the past three years, Comcast’s Senior VP of Governmental Affairs has been Meredith Baker. Baker’s last job was the Commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission, where she signed off on the controversial NBCUniversal sale to Comcast in 2009.

Now we know that Baker, the former FCC Commissioner and a public official, was around to help make sure net neutrality died so Internet costs could soar, and that Time Warner Cable would be allowed to fold into Comcast, despite claims that the new megacorp might violate antitrust laws.”

Study finds that minorities face more exposure to pollution

Racial and economic injustice have long been accepted as linked. Yet it’s becoming more obvious that another injustice is facing those already disadvantaged in American society: environmental injustice.

Back in 2005, the Associated Press analyzed information from a federal environmental health database and found that black people are 79% more likely than white people to live in neighborhoods where industrial pollution poses a serious health risk. That 2005 analysis also found that in certain states, Hispanic and Asian people were disproportionately affected as well.

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