daisyrosario:

khealywu:

aileenlittlehandsclark:

mugglenet:

7 years ago today, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows hit bookshelves

*hyperventilates*

My friends Juan and Stephanie bought the book and promptly went to The Cheesecake Factory at the top of Macy’s in downtown SF and didn’t say a goddam word to each other besides ordering food. And that was to the waiter, who in turn looked at us like we were freaks.

I bought it at midnight at the Barnes and Noble on 6th & 21st, walked to Park to catch the 6 and got through about a hundred pages by the time we got to my stop at 116th. The whole train car was watching me, I think. Someone asked how it was and I just said ‘what?!’ and then literally ran home to keep reading it.

My then-boyfriend picked it up for me because I had to work until 2am. Then when I got home I read until I couldn’t read anymore, took a nap, then got up to get back to reading and finish the book.

My friend asked me if I was excited for the book to come out. I was, obviously, but told her I was just going to reserve it at the library because I couldn’t afford to buy it the day it came out. I arrived home one day to a package. She had ordered it for me. After thanking her profusely I sat up all night to read it.

micdotcom:

Salem mayor has put her money where her mouth is over local college’s LBGT bigotry

Earlier this summer, Kim Driscoll, the first female mayor of Salem, Mass., pulled funding from Gordon College, a small, Christian liberal arts school located outside Boston. The school had cosponsored a letter to President Obama asking for a religious exemption to his executive order to end employment discrimination based on sexual orientation. 
What Mayor Kim Driscoll did about it | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

Salem mayor has put her money where her mouth is over local college’s LBGT bigotry

Earlier this summer, Kim Driscoll, the first female mayor of Salem, Mass., pulled funding from Gordon College, a small, Christian liberal arts school located outside Boston. The school had cosponsored a letter to President Obama asking for a religious exemption to his executive order to end employment discrimination based on sexual orientation. 

What Mayor Kim Driscoll did about it | Follow micdotcom

“His explanation for Netflix’s on-screen congestion messages contains a nice little diagram. The diagram shows a lovely uncongested Verizon network, conveniently color-coded in green. It shows a network that has lots of unused capacity at the most busy time of the day. Think about that for a moment: Lots of unused capacity. So point number one is that Verizon has freely admitted that is has the ability to deliver lots of Netflix streams to broadband customers requesting them, at no extra cost. But, for some reason, Verizon has decided that it prefers not to deliver these streams, even though its subscribers have paid it to do so.”

Verizon’s Accidental Mea Culpa | Beyond Bandwidth

Level 3 (one of the biggest Internet backbone providers) calls out Verizon regarding Netflix congestion.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
A passenger jet, Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 from the Netherlands to Malaysia, was shot down over eastern Ukraine yesterday. Most of the answers are still forthcoming on this one, but none of nearly 300 passengers on board are thought to have survived. 
Who shot it down? Ukraine itself has denied involvement or capability and several signs seem to point to the pro-Russian separatists. 
Separatists have agreed to allow international investigators access to the crash site. 
Earlier this week, Ukraine accused Russia of shooting down a Ukrainian fighter jet in its own airspace. 
Israel launched a new phase of Operation Protective Edge: a ground invasion. According to Gaza’s health ministry, 24 Palestinians have been killed since Thursday night and more than 200 injured. Israel is claiming 14 of those it killed were terrorists and has lost one soldier. 
Netanyahu has said Israel is prepared to “significantly widen" the offensive. 
Inside Gaza’s tunnels — which have been a primary stated target of Israeli forces over the past three weeks.
Earlier in Gaza, a strike from a naval ship killed four Palestinian boys playing on a beach.
Three Israelis were indicted in the revenge killing of 16-year-old Mohammad Abu Khdeir.
Parisian police are considering a ban on pro-Palestine demonstrations.
14 Tunisian soldiers have been killed in a militant attack near the Algerian border. 
Libyan militant groups battling for control of the Tripoli airport have agreed to a ceasefire. 
In the Central African Republic, it’s worse than we thought.
Assad begins his third term as Syria’s president. 
Kuwaiti protesters demanding the release of an opposition leader and the purging of corrupt judges were met with tear gas over the weekend.
Anti-terrorism laws in Gulf states are being deployed against dissent and opposition, not militancy.
Tribesmen bombed Yemen’s main oil export pipeline on Saturday.
After a Houthi takeover of the Yemeni city of Amran last week, tens of thousands have fled the city.
Intelligence is linking Saudi chemist turned Al Qaeda bombmaker Ibrahim Hassan al-Asiri to ISIS and the Nusra Front.
Saudi Arabia is positioned in the middle of extremism — from Yemen on one side and Iraq on the other.
A Saudi rights lawyer has been jailed for 15 years for “inciting public opinion” and “undermining judicial authorities.”
Qatar is planning an $11bn deal to buy Apache helicopters and Patriot missiles from the US.
A suicide bombing in an Afghan market on Tuesday killed at least 89 people — the worst insurgent attack since 2001.
Kabul airport came under attack by militants on Thursday.
Afghanistan has jailed a Pakistani journalist, detaining him while reportedly on his way to interview Taliban sources. He was originally accused of spying, but is now charged with illegal entry into the country.
The outgoing top commander in Afghanistan, General Joseph Dunford, is expressing concern about the approach to the drawdown.
The widow of the first assassinated Iranian nuclear scientists speaks about her husband’s fears and death, and about meeting with his assassin. 
Protests and violent clashes continue in Cambodia over a disputed election. Eight members of the opposition in parliament have been arrested on charges of inciting insurrection. 
A Dutch court ruled that the government bore responsibility for the deaths of 300 of the victims of the Srebrenica massacre in Bosnia in 1995, owing to failures by Dutch peacekeepers. 
What are the aircraft carrying out 21st century aerial reconnaissance?
Alan Rusbridger interviews Edward Snowden.
A bill presented in Australian parliament this week could mean that journalists face jail over intelligence leaks.
The US plans to transfer six low-level Guantánamo detainees to Uruguay, possibly next month. 
A US Navy nurse has refused to force-feed prisoners in Guantánamo.
The Guardian looks into hunger strikes carried out by the non-Afghan detainees that the US continues to hold, largely under cover of secrecy, at Bagram.
Blackwater employees testified against former colleagues in the trial over the 2007 Nisour Square shooting. 
And some helpful suggestions for naming the latest operation in Iraq (Operation Shiite Storm, anyone?). You get to pick your favorite.
Photo: Donetsk, Ukraine. A section of the miles-long wreckage of MH17 smolders yesterday. Credit: ITAR-TASS/Barcroft Media.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Donetsk, Ukraine. A section of the miles-long wreckage of MH17 smolders yesterday. Credit: ITAR-TASS/Barcroft Media.

"Human beings don't have a right to water."

downlo:

guavasita:

sorry-dong-dong:

stfueverything:

Across the globe, Nestlé is pushing to privatize and control public water resources.

Nestlé’s Chairman of the Board, Peter Brabeck, has explained his philosophy with “The one opinion, which I think is extreme, is represented by the NGOs, who bang on about declaring water a public right. That means as a human being you should have a right to water. That’s an extreme solution.”

Since that quote has gotten widespread attention, Brabeck has backtracked, but his company has not. Around the world, Nestlé is bullying communities into giving up control of their water. It’s time we took a stand for public water sources.

Tell Nestlé that we have a right to water. Stop locking up our resources!

At the World Water Forum in 2000, Nestlé successfully lobbied to stop water from being declared a universal right — declaring open hunting season on our local water resources by the multinational corporations looking to control them. For Nestlé, this means billions of dollars in profits. For us, it means paying up to 2,000 percent more for drinking water because it comes from a plastic bottle.

Now, in countries around the world, Nestlé is promoting bottled water as a status symbol. As it pumps out fresh water at high volume, water tables lower and local wells become degraded. Safe water becomes a privilege only affordable for the wealthy.

In our story, clean water is a resource that should be available to all. It should be something we look after for the public good, to keep safe for generations, not something we pump out by billions of gallons to fuel short-term private profits. Nestlé thinks our opinion is “extreme”, but we have to make a stand for public resources. Please join us today in telling Nestlé that it’s not “extreme” to treat water like a public right.

Tell Nestlé to start treating water like a public right, not a source for private profits! 

Sources and further reading:
Nestlé: The Global Search for Liquid Gold, Urban Times, June 11th, 2013
Bottled Water Costs 2000 Times As Much As Tap Water, Business Insider, July 12th, 2013
Peter Brabeck discussion his philosophy about water rights

holy fuck

this is a huge deal in latin america especially and i need some more people to be aware of this and care

Mr. Burns was supposed to be a joke, not inspiration!